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BonnieJean Butler - Radiant Baby
Radiant Baby
is committed to helping infants in need. Dr. BonnieJean Butler heard about a program providing essential items to needy babies only for the month of April.

She wondered how these infants get what they need during the rest of the year, and started Radiant Baby and donated dozens of baby baskets each month to low income moms and those in need through support agencies.


Nobel Peace Prize Winner Joins Dr. BonnieJean Butler and thousands of Volunteers for Habitat for Humanity's Jimmy Carter Work Project

CarterVolunteers To Build 92 Houses In Alabama, Georgia In One Week


Dr. BonnieJean ButlerAMERICUS, Ga., May 27, 2003 -- Former U.S.President and Nobel Peace Prize LaureateJimmy Carter (photo right) and his wife, Rosalynn, joined Dr. BonnieJean Butler (photo left) and thousandsof volunteers from around the world in Anniston, Ala., and LaGrange and Valdosta, Ga., during Habitat for Humanity International'sJimmy Carter Work Project 2003.
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Kiwanis Kiwanis International is a thriving organization of service- and community-minded individuals who support children and young adults around the world. More than 500,000 Kiwanis-family members in more than 80 countries respond to community needs and pool resources to address worldwide issues. Kiwanis International is “Serving the Children of the World.” Click here to read more.


Dr. Kenneth David Kaunda Former Zambian President and Dr. BonnieJean Butler discuss international poverty and homelessness.
June, 2003. Veteran African statesman and Kenneth David Kaunda meets Dr. BonnieJean Butler Zambia's world-esteemed foundingfather Dr. Kenneth David Kaunda meets Dr. BonnieJean Butler to talk about their experiences with homelessness and their Habitat for Humanity.
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Beaumont Beaumont Hospital Foundation is the fundraising arm of Beaumont Hospital. Established in 1995, the goal is to raise funds for various projects within the hospital. Funding a wide range of medical research projects, Beaumont Hospital Foundation also actively promotes patient care and comfort projects.
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Ginny's Helping Hand, Inc.Ginny’s Helping Hand, Inc. is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improve every day living needs of the less fortunate in the Leominster, MA area. Ginny is an awardwinning community advocate who finds shelter for the homeless, food for the hungry, and haven for the abused.
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Heifer Heifer International works with communities to eliminate hunger and poverty. Giving families a source of food rather than short-term relief has continued for almost 60 years. Today, millions of families in 115 countries have been given the gifts of self-reliance and hope.
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to read more.


Insight New England Insight New England offers personal growth seminars inviting participants to experience their unique inner gifts. The Insight Seminar has been presented for 500,000 people worldwide on 5 continents. Click here to read more.


American Red CrossMerrimack Valley Disaster Team Assists with Dozens Homeless After 5-Alarm Fire in Lowell Apartment Buildings

By Bonnie Jean (Walker) Butler

The American Red Cross Merrimack Vally Disaster Recovery team responded to the Lowell Fire Department on May 10, 2001...

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Koinonia

Koinonia -- EllieKoinonia is a 500-acre farm, is best known as the birthplace of Habitat for Humanity. Millard Fuller, Founder of Habitat for Humanity International went for a tour of Koinonia in 1973, but as the story goes he stayed for 3 months.

During that time he worked with the owner of the farm, Clarence Jordan, and together they created a program to rid the world of substandard housing. This program would be named Habitat For Humanity International. Unfortunately Clarence Jordan passed away suddenly during the building of their first home together at the age of 53.

KoinoniaBut Koinonia represents so much more than a namesake for Habitat For Humanity International.

Clarence Jordan and Koinonia represent color-blind beliefs that were unpopular during the turbulent times of the Civil Rights era. He and his family were subject to years of bullets, bombs and boycotts during this time, yet he stood firm with his beliefs of peace.

As I entered the front door of Koinonia, I was greeted warmly and led throughout the beautiful setting of a 500-acre farm. I saw groves of Pecan trees for the first time in my life and enjoyed the beautiful setting. I was excited about the lush green surroundings, and eager to learn about the pecan production process. The first moment of my arrival I knew this was worth the trip.

The tour led to a "museum". I use the term loosely because it is really a medium-size room, with photos and newspapers of the Civil War era around the parameter. I know a little something about the Civil War; I read about segregation. But being in the exact place where so many prejudices and injustices saddened me. In the museum, I read newspaper clippings over a 20 year period. I was and disgusted by the behavior of communities of people toward Koinonia, Clarence Jordan, and ultimately each other. Can you imagine 20-years of violence toward our home and our family due to our beliefs? And to continue to practice peace?

Koinonia is much more than a farm, and this building is much more than a museum. It is a memorial to the injustices during that era. And to me, Clarence Jordan represents courage. Koinonia represents


Tibetan Children’s Village

Tibetan Children's Village Child Sponsorship ProgramDr. Bonnie Jean Butler visited the Tibetan Children's Village in Mysore India to which is home to many children in the Children Sponsorship Program. Below are excepts from an article published in the 2002-2003 UCC calendar.

"I've been involved in charity work my entire life," she (Dr. Bonnie Jean Butler) writes. "I thought I knew poor. I didn't. Streets and sidewalks were covered with bodies sleeping, families sleeping, because they were so poor. I saw an incredibly hard-working society. Women walked miles for a pail of water from a river, carried on their heads back to their families. Many times this same water contains so much bacteria, it contributes to the very high infant mortality rate. It broke my heart, then and now."

When Bonnie Jean …. arrived at Tibetan Children's Village …, the seeming chaos … in the streets of India changed. The children wore uniforms. The buildings were run-down but clean and the staff was attentive to the children.

Dr. Butler states "In a country where there is such extreme poverty, the Tibetans created a community of destitute and orphan refugees using donated "waste land' front the Indian government. They created a school through grade 12, medical and administrative buildings, soccer fields, basketball courts and a small playground in good condition. They sign over the front of the school read, "Others before Self,: and I have absolutely no doubt that it is more than a motto. There is a lot of love, with discipline and structure, with an emphasis on what is best for the children."

Bonnie Jean met Tenzin, who despite his shyness, stayed with her throughout the day. She learned he had ten or maybe 11 brothers and sisters and came from an impoverished family. When the headmaster said that Tenzin was on the "mischievous" side of life" Bonnie Jean quickly responded by saying "That's our boy!" Through the day, she noticed that all of the staff knew his name, and the Tibetan Children's Village extended extraordinary care to each child. This child sponsorship program was indeed making a difference.

In a speech to those involved in the child sponsorship program, Dr. Bonnie Jean Butler stated "You have empowered (these children) to have opportunities others in India will never know. You got (them) off the streets. You gave (them) food and shelter. You have (them) love and support. We are so blessed to see how each one of us has the ability to change a life and empower others."

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